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All you need to know about adapting your flue

As standard, your oven will arrive with a straight flue at the front of the oven- shown in the image below. However you can adapt this if you wish!

 

When delivered your flue will be in its original stainless steel form, however you can paint this black if you prefer. To achieve the look below, be sure to use a matte black stove paint. We now also sell black flues at an extra cost is this is how you wish to stylise your oven.

 

Using 45° angle bends you can change the direction of your flue and where it appears to leave the oven. You can view the angle bends on our website here. Once the additional flue pieces have been installed you can then render/ enclose the oven to conceal the bends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to increase the length of your flue then you can absolutely do this using our additional 500mm flue lengths (suitable for the Primo or Mezzo ovens), check these out here.

If you are going to be passing your flue through a roof/ wall, then you will most likely need a twin wall, insulated flue system. As we are not specialists in the field, we cannot advise ourselves as every job is specific to the customer. We would instead recommend to contact a HETAS registered engineer to undertake a flue survey where they can advise further. You can find your local engineer here.

Are you interested in our wood fired ovens? Head over to our product pages for more information.

To keep in the loop with all the latest news make sure you follow us on InstagramTwitterFacebook and Pinterest.

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All you need to know about Gas Burners

Occasionally, we get customers enquire whether they can put a gas burner into their Stone Bake oven, the answer is yes! We’ve put together a little guide for you detailing the basic information you need about gas burners.

  • We only ever advise using a gas burner in one of our kit ovens, and it must be the Mezzo, Vento or Gusto

 

  • For a Mezzo you will need a P1 gas burner, for a Vento or Gusto you will need a P1+ gas burner

 

  • We need to know the thickness of the base that the oven will be sat on and also whether you require an LPG or Natural gas burner
  • Gas burners usually take 2-3 weeks to arrive with you as each is made to order

 

  • Once you have the gas burner, you will need to organise a gas safe engineer to core and install the burner for you, it is your preference whether this is on the right or left hand side

 

  • We would never advise running the oven on gas and wood at the same time as this can make your oven overheat. You can run your oven on gas to get it up to temperature and then switch to wood on the opposite side of the oven, just ensure the gas cap is on.

 

We hope this has been helpful, if there is any other information you need to know please give us a call on 01425 204985 where a member of our team will be happy to help.

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How to build a mobile pizza/wood fired oven

We’ve had lots of customers choose to build one of our wood fired ovens into a trailer or into a vehicle to start up an on-the-go business. This blog post aims to give you a brief outline of what you need to consider when deciding to embark on this exciting DIY task.

Which oven?
Out of our wood fired oven range, we recommend either the Mezzo 76 or the Vento 100 for a mobile unit. All ovens that are being used for a mobile unit need to be one of our Kit ovens and must be built in so that the oven is secure during transit. It also means that there is little to no heat transfer when the oven is in use.

The Mezzo 76 is ideal to use if you have a limited space as it has an internal diameter of 76cm. This can fit 2 x 12” pizzas or 2 x large roasting dishes in at one time. As with all of our ovens, once up to temperature, pizzas can cook in 90 seconds or less so, you can have them firing out in no time.

If you have a slightly larger space to work with, the Vento 100 might be suitable as it has an internal diameter of 100cm. It can fit 4 x 12” pizzas or 3 x large roasting dishes in at one time so, it’s perfect for if you’re looking to cater for larger groups of people.

image2-11-1000x1000Vehicle / Trailer
As we don’t offer installation, it’s your responsibility to source a trailer or vehicle for your mobile unit. When choosing a vehicle, it’s vital to make sure that it can withhold the weight of your oven. The Mezzo 76 weighs approximately 250kg and the Vento 100 weighs approximately 350kg. In addition, you’ll also need to include the weight of the steel frame used to support the oven, insulation and finishing materials

There are lots of different options you can use to build one of our wood fired ovens into a mobile unit. We’ve had customers who’ve used trailers, vans, trucks and even caravans.

Stone Bake Top Tip: You’ll need to make sure that your licence allows you to drive vehicles that are larger than the average car and trailers that are over 750kg and braked.

Building it in
You’ll need a stand for your oven to sit on, whether you are building it into
an open trailer or into a unit such as a caravan, we recommend getting a custom stand from a metal fabricator. Metal stands are most suited for building a mobile unit as it’s the lightest option. Remember to make sure it can withhold the weight of your oven!

We also recommend using calcium silicate board that is at least 50mm in thickness and insulation wool that is at least 150mm in thickness to ensure as little heat transfer as possible.

image1-12-1000x1000To secure your oven onto your metal stand, we advise to use perforated, metal strapping. It will need to go over the oven diagonally and then bolted down onto your stand, we recommend at least 5 straps. We also advise that L shaped support plates are fixed around the oven perimeter to prevent the oven sliding on the metal base. This will keep it secure when in transit.

So that your insulation wool is covered we recommend using metal cladding if you are building your oven on to a trailer. If you are building your oven into an enclosed unit, such as a caravan, you can fill the void with extra insulation. Alternatively, to reduce the area of insulation needed if the space is large, non combustible panels can be fixed round the oven.

As always, if you have anymore questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 01425 204985. One of our technical guys, Patrick, has had lots of experience with building ovens into trailers and is more than happy to help.

Keep up to date on all the latest at Stone Bake HQ by following us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

For more information on our wood fired ovens, visit our product page.

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How to build your wood fired oven indoors

Although our oven range was designed primarily to live outside, we get many customers who decide to incorporate their oven into their indoor kitchen. We’ve put together all of the standard guidelines for building one of our wood fired ovens indoors. Every install will be different depending on the building and the area of the country so, it’s the customer’s responsibility to ensure they meet any building regulations and laws.

Which oven?
The ovens that are suited for indoor builds are the Mezzo 76 Kit, the Vento 100 and the Gusto 120. All of these ovens are DEFRA exempt therefore; they are suitable to be used for indoor use, even in smoke controlled zones!

Our recommended clearances for Kit ovens are 100mm from the oven to any combustible materials. When building one of our ovens indoors, it is essential to use all of the insulation materials supplied with the oven so there is minimal heat transfer from the oven to any of your internal walls or structures. To ensure the safest installation possible, you can use pourable insulation such as vermiculite to fill any void space.Judith Jungmayr - Vento

Flue extraction
The flue gets extremely hot when in use so there must be specific guidelines followed as it can be a fire hazard. Therefore, the flue must be a twin wall, insulated flue system. As we don’t specialise in flue systems, we suggest contacting your local flue specialist for more information. Alternatively contact HETAS who should be able to undertake a flue survey at your property. Click here, enter your postcode to find a HETAS registered installer local to you.

Stand
As with all of our Kit ovens, you’ll need to build your own stand. This stand must be able to withhold the weight of your oven and there should be no combustible materials running directly underneath your oven, as it does get extremely hot. We recommend placing your oven on a concrete plinth that’s at least 150mm in thickness.

bromilow-wood-fired-pizza-oven1Position
There are two main ways to install your oven indoors. Firstly, many customers decide to build the whole of their oven indoors. This means that the oven dome will also be built inside your property giving you the full Italian pizzeria effect.

Other customers prefer to have just the oven mouth on show. To do this, you’ll need to pass the oven mouth through your wall. Some customers will build the whole oven into the wall cavity so the dome is completely hidden. Alternatively, you can build a stand outside your chosen wall and have the dome of the oven outside. As long as you have used all the insulation materials and have fully insulated the oven, this won’t compromise the 24+ hours heat retention.

No matter what indoor design you go for, we’re certain that you’ll be able to successfully incorporate your wood fired oven within your kitchen!

If you need more advice on how to build your oven inside your property then please feel free to give us a call on 01425 204985.

For more information on our wood fired ovens, please visit the product pages.

Keep up to date with all the latest happenings and follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.

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How to make a block work stand with a tiled top- Step-by-step process

At Stone Bake HQ, we often get asked about different stands that can be constructed and what materials are suitable for one of our wood fired ovens to be placed onto. One of our customers Garry Roberts, has been kind enough to send in photos of how he achieved a block work stand with the appearance of a fully stone tiled top.

Garry built this stand for his Mezzo 76 Kit oven, which means it arrived with the insulation materials needed to fully build in the oven. We’ve put together a step-by-step guide on how to achieve a stand and a finish like Garry’s.

Step 1: Find an area that is suitable for your oven to be constructed. Preferably a hard and level surface.

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  • Please Note! Garry has chosen an uneven surface so he has cast a concrete plinth to build his stand onto.
  • Please Note! We have recommended clearances for all of our ovens. Ovens in Go form: Ensure a minimum of 500mm oven clearance from all walls of the oven and the oven mouth. Kit Ovens: Ensure there is a clearance of at least 100mm from all walls of the oven. Clearances for all flues are 900mm.

Step 2: Construct your stand using breezeblocks, ensuring that at least three sides of the oven is supported and that each side is a minimum of 1 standard brick thickness (103mm). You will also need to make sure that you are happy that your stand can fully withhold the weight of your oven.

Each oven weighs the following:

Primo: 200kg approx.
Mezzo: 250kg approx.
Vento: 350kg approx.
Gusto: 420kg approx.

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Step 3: Next you will need to cast a concrete plinth of at least 150mm in thickness for your oven to be assembled onto. For this part it is probably a good idea to have a look at stage 6-8 of our Mezzo render build manual and adapting the process to suit your stand design.

Step 4: Using a standard sand and cement mix, you can render over the breezeblocks in order to get a smooth finish.

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Step 5: If you are building your oven in, you will need to place your calcium silicate board on top of your concrete plinth before assembling the oven. Once you have done this, you can then start to assemble your oven- remembering to place the back base piece down first, then the front piece and finally you can carefully place your dome on top. Using a Stanley knife, cut around the calcium silicate board so that it is flush with the oven.

Please note, if you have one of our Go ovens, you can simply assemble the base pieces directly onto your concrete plinth and it is ready to go!

Step 6: Now, you can clad the top of your stand with your chosen stone tiles. To achieve the appearance that the oven is sat on the stone tiles, cut them to size so they are a snug fit around the base of your oven.

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Step 7: Once your oven is fully assembled, you can then place your flue and flue cap into the flue hole situated at the front of your oven. Once your flue is in place you can then start covering your oven with the insulation wool provided, securing with chicken wire and cable ties. Next you can place your decorative archway at the front of your oven, securing with some high heat silicone mastic.

Step 8:  Once all of your insulation materials are fully secure you can then move onto rendering your oven with a standard sand and cement mix.  Make sure you allow time for your render to fully dry before moving onto the next step.

Step 9: If you have built your oven in, there will be little heat transfer due to the insulation materials. Therefore, you won’t need a high-heat paint and you can use a standard masonry paint that is suitable for external use.

  • Please Note! If you have one of our Go ovens and you wish to paint it, you will need to make sure you use a high-heat paint. Our recommended supplier is Bailey Paints.

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Step 10: Now all you need to do is fire up your wood fired oven. As it is the first fire up, a slow and steady fire will be most effective, as you will need to burn out any additional moisture. The easiest way to tell if your oven has reached its optimum temperature is to look out for a clear patch forming inside the top of your dome.

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If you need any more information about building a stand, assembling your oven or building it in, then please don’t hesitate to contact us on 01425 204985, we will be more than happy to advise you further.

If you think you might be interested in one of our residential ovens, visit our Primo, Mezzo and Vento an Gusto pages for prices, information and technical drawings.  Please don’t hesitate to contact the team on 01425 204985 if you have any further questions.

Don’t forget you can keep up-to-date with all the latest Stone Bake happenings over on our social channels:Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest!

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Painting your wood fired oven

Here at Stone Bake HQ, a question we get asked a lot is ‘Can I paint my oven?’ The answer to this is YES! However, we do have a few guidelines you will need to follow in order to get the best results possible.

Ovens
Our Primo 60 and Mezzo 76 can be purchased in their core form meaning that once assembled, they are ready to go. All of our core ovens are a traditionally rustic, terracotta colour. Some customers may decide that they wish to change this colour to suit their garden design. It’s so simple to do this; you just need to make sure that you use a high heat paint that is suitable for external use.

Our recommended supplier is Cornish Lime and their Beeck Mineral Paints are best suited to our ovens. They have a large range of different colours on offer, from cobalt blue to purple! Another great thing about Cornish Lime is that they offer test pots, which is ideal if you’re not sure which colour to go for. We also recommend bailey paints

Before painting your Go oven, we also highly recommend that you apply the Stone Bake Oven Sealant .The sealant will act as a weatherproofing agent meaning that it remains dry and won’t compromise your fire up time.

stone-bake-oven-wood-fired-before-after1

Kit Ovens
There’s a bit more flexibility when it comes to our Kit ovens because once insulated, there will be little heat transfer. This means that you can use a standard masonry paint that is suitable for external use, which is available from any good builders merchants.

For more inspiration, check out our inspiration to see what some of our customers have achieved- we love this purple one! 20150621_163033-1-1000x1000

Don’t forget you can catch up with all the latest Stone Bake news and updates on our social media. Be sure to follow us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest

If you are interested in our residential oven range, visit our PrimoMezzoVento and Gusto pages for prices, information and technical drawings. Please don’t hesitate to contact the team on 01905 964276 should you have any further questions.

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How to make a wooden oven stand with a concrete base- Step-by-step process

Here at Stone Bake we often get asked about the different stands and finishes that can be achieved for our ovens. One of our customers, Steve Brown, sent us in some fantastic step-by-step images of his process start to finish of making a wooden stand with a concrete base.

Steve has a Primo 60 Kit oven, which means it arrives with the insulation materials you need to build your oven in. Below you can see the start to finish process he went through to achieve this.

  • Please note! We would never advise having wood running directly underneath the oven. This can be very dangerous as our ovens get extremely hot, meaning it would be a fire hazard. If you want to build a wooden stand like Steve, ALWAYS ensure that you have a concrete layer between the oven base and the stand that is at least 150mm thick.

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Step One: Find a suitable area that you want to have your oven.

  • Please Note! Always make a note of our recommended clearances. Our recommended clearances from combustibles differ depending on whether the oven is built in or not. Ovens in Go form: Ensure a 500mm oven clearance is maintained from all walls of the oven and the oven mouth. Kit Ovens: If the oven is built in to The Stone Bake Oven Company specifications oven clearances are reduced to 100mm from all walls of the oven.

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Step Two: Construct the wooden outline of your stand. You will need to ensure that this is sturdy and can withhold the weight of the oven.

The weights of the ovens are as follows:

Primo: 200kg approx.

Mezzo: 250kg approx.

Vento: 350kg approx.

Gusto: 420kg approx.

steve brown

Step Three: Next you will need to place some cement board (aqua board) on top of your frame. Once you have constructed your frame, build some temporary wooden sides, which come parallel with the edge of your stand. This will ensure that once you remove them and your concrete is set, everything will be level and aligned precisely. When you have made sure that everything is level and completely flat, you can then start to create your concrete base.

Once the void is 2/3 filled you can place a square metal wire over the concrete, which will help you ensure that everything is even and level. You can then put the rest of the concrete over the top, leaving it to dry for at least 24-48 hours. Please ensure that the concrete is at least 150mm thick.

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Step 4: Leave your concrete to fully set. Once set, you can then remove the temporary wooden sides, exposing your concrete base.

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Step 5:If you are building your oven in, you will firstly need to place your calcium silicate board underneath where you will want your oven base to sit. You can then assemble your oven pieces together.

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Always place the back base piece down first, then the front piece down. Once your base is assembled you can carefully place on your oven dome.

  • Please Note! Steve has one of our older style square bases, which he has had to cut down. All of our ovens now have a round base. This change was purely for aesthetic reasons and that some customers had to cut the corners off of the base pieces.

 

IMG_1659 IMG_1674Step 6: Once your oven is assembled you can then lay down bricks flat all around the oven as seen in this picture. From here you can clad the bricks with tiles of your choice.

Step 7: Now you can move onto building your oven in. Make sure that you cover your freshly clad tiles to make sure they don’t get damaged when building the oven in. You can then place the pre-fabricated archway at the front of your oven, insert the flue into the flue hole and start placing the insulation wool over the dome.

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Step 8: Next, place chicken wire over the top of the insulation wool, as seen in this picture. This secures down the wool, ready for rendering. Using a standard sand and cement mix, you can then render in your oven. 

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Step 9: Once your render has dried, many of our customers like to paint their oven. If you are using your oven in its core form you will need to make sure that you paint it with high heat paint from our recommended suppliers Mike Wye-https://www.mikewye.co.uk/product/seciltek-silicate-paint-sp-01/

If you have built in your oven, then you can use a standard masonry paint, providing that it is suitable for external use. This is because your oven is built in so there is little to no heat transfer, meaning you don’t need a special high heat paint.

Step 10: Now all that’s left is to fire up your wood fired oven for the first time. When lighting your oven for the first time, the firing up process will take longer than usual. This is because you will need to get rid of any additional moisture in the oven.

  • Please note! You wouldn’t want an aggressive fire whilst doing this; a nice slow fire without too much wood will be most effective.
  • Top tip: A really easy way to tell when your oven has reached its optimum temperature is to look out for a clear patch forming in the top of the dome.

If you need any more information about building a stand, assembling your oven or building it in then please don’t hesitate to contact us on 01425 204985, we will be happy to help and advise you.

Don’t forget you can catch up with all the latest Stone Bake news and updates on our social media. Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest!

If you are interested in our residential oven range, visit our PrimoMezzoVento and Gusto pages for prices, information and technical drawings. Please don’t hesitate to contact the team on 01425 204985 should you have any further questions.